ROSAMUND’S MAIALE AL LATTE – PORK LEG BRAISED IN MILK
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This is my take on the Italian classic Maiale al Latte – lamb braised in milk. It is not often served in England – which is a pity because it is delicious.  Served as the Italians do, with the milk curds separated out, it doesn’t look particularly appetising – though the curds have a wonderful flavour.   If you want a more sophisticated (though less traditional) presentation, the sauce can be whizzed in a liquidiser to produce an equally delicious smooth cream.
Fettuccine with herbs and a fennel and pomegranate salad make excellent accompaniments.  For the fettuccine, cook in plenty of well-salted water in the normal way.  As soon as you have strained the pasta, add a slug of good quality olive oil and, if you can get it, some finely shredded wild garlic – it will wilt in the heat of the fettuccine.  Test if it needs more salt and add a few grinds of black pepper and a good handful of finely chopped parsley, tarragon and chives. 
The salad is just very finely sliced fennel with a good sprinkling of pomegranate seeds and a French dressing made from lemon juice and olive oil.  At this time of year, it looks marvellous sprinkled with a mixture of herb flowers – rosemary, thyme and wild garlic look pretty.   
The quantities given are for a whole leg of Middle White which will serve 12people.  If you are using just the shank end, reduce the quantities of the other ingredients and the cooking time by about a third.
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HUNTSHAM COTTAGE PIE
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Here is a recipe for a good, old-fashioned comfort food.  However we think our Longhorn mince turns the humble cottage pie into food for the Gods.  I always try not to set myself up in competition with Michelin starred professional chefs so, when we have chefs visiting to look round the farm, we usually give them nothing more complicated than a cottage pie.  This is the recipe we use.  Note that there are quite a lot of non-traditional touches – the lemon rind, alcohol, even the mushrooms.  I think they give the dish that little extra something but, if you want to omit the frills and furbelows and use a basic cottage pie recipe, the quality of the mince will shine through and it will still be delicious.
 The quantities given are deliberately small and based on one pack of our mince – in deference to the number of small households in the current lockdown.  This will be generous for two.  For two packs of mince obviously double the quantities – the mince mixture will last indefinitely in the freezer. 
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CURED LEG OF MIDDLE WHITE PORK
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The curing process takes 8-9 months for optimum results and slithers from one these legs make delicious nibbles with Christmas drinks, served either plain or on little toasts, with or without cornichons and/or onion marmalade. Or a whole home-cured leg makes a very good Christmas present. The ingredients other than the leg of Middle White Pork are easy to acquire and, if you order one of our pork legs for curing, we will give you a length of muslin ‘sleeve’ suitable for the hanging process.
The recipe calls for mixed spices. The photograph shows some of these spices whole but what you need for this recipe are dried spices, ground fairly finely in a food processor or bought in powder form. You don’t need to use all the spices in the list and the proportions are up to you but I have found that a mixture of all six below, in roughly equal proportions, works well.
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MIDDLE WHITE SUCKLING PIG WITH CRAB APPLE JELLY, POMEGRANATE SAUCE AND JEWELLED RICE

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Our crab apple trees were weighed down with fruit this autumn with the result that I have a quantity of crab apple jelly in the larder.  If you aren’t lucky enough to have a crabapple tree, it is easy enough to get the jelly on line – or another reasonably tart jelly, such as quince, would work as a substitute in this recipe.  It is only worth using pink champagne in the sauce if you can get one of those mini bottles – otherwise rosé wine or a dry white wine will work perfectly well.  Because this recipe is designed for a romantic evening, I have deliberately made it quite simple – so that the cook has not been reduced to an exhausted wreck by the time (s)he comes to eat it!  The jewelled rice is very easy to do but is delicious – and gives the whole dish a nicely festive appearance. 
I have given quantities for two people but there will be two extra servings of the meat – which is excellent cold with the jelly. 
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MIDDLE WHITE PORK WITH ARTICHOKE SAUCE

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This recipe started life as a way to make some inroads into the huge quantities of both Jerusalem artichokes and leeks which we have in the garden at the moment but turned out so delicious I thought I would share it.  Unlike much other pork, Middle White is not just for lunchtime – this recipe would make a very nice dinner party dish, generous for 4 people, but it also works well for two people in lockdown together. If you are just two, there will be meat left over to eat cold – but there is nothing more delicious than cold Middle White.  The quantities I have given for the sauce will make quite a large quantity – plenty for four people.  It sits somewhere between a sauce and a very light additional vegetable and I think it is unusually good, with the cider giving a very slight ‘petillant’ sensation on the tongue.  I serve this dish with peas and some crispy rosemary and garlic potatoes – recipe below. 
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ROSAMUND’S BOEUF A L’ORANGE

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The idea for this recipe came from Simon Hopkinson – to whose splendid books I so often turn in times of trouble – his recipe, which is for ox cheek is, as he says, a classic.  French home cooking may not be what it once was but the French cookery websites are a lot more interesting than we have available in English and I have trawled through any any number of recipes for Joue de boeuf (ox cheek) à l’orange, each one with as mall variation from the rest,  to come up with this way of cooking our Longhorn diced shin.   
Apart from the fact that the number of recipes on French websites clearly mean that the French are able to buy ox cheek (a feat in itself in the UK), they are obviously not too pushed for time. Because – it’s no good beating about the bush – this recipe does involve quite a lot of painful chopping and slicing. When I made it for the photograph last weekend, I found that a (large) glass of the Pinot Grigio I used for the marinade and Schubert Impromptus in the hands of the incomparable Alfred Brendel in the background made the whole task quite therapeutic – but there is no denying it took time.  However all the effort is repaid many times over in the eating – this is an unusual, but absolutely delicious, recipe.   
It doesn’t make much sense to make a small amount though so I have given quantities based on 1kg of meat which will easily feed six – like all such dishes, it freezes perfectly.  Note that it is best if the meat is marinaded overnight so you need to start a day before you plan to eat.
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BOEUF BOURGUIGNON

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This is my tried and tested recipe for a favourite classic.  I am not claiming it is the quickest and easiest way to do it – prepared like this, it does take a bit of time so I don’t think it’s worth making in a very small quantity. The quantities below will feed six but this is a dish which freezes perfectly – so, if you are cooking for two or three, make these quantities and freeze what you don’t eat. 
In England, Boeuf Bourguignon seems usually to be served with mashed potato but I much prefer what you normally get in France with dishes of this sort – plain boiled potatoes with a light dusting of finely chopped parsley.  The dish also needs a robust green vegetable like Swiss Chard or Savoy cabbage.        
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CHRISTMAS SUCKLING PIG

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Our suckling pig makes a delicious treat for the Christmas period, whether as an alternative to turkey on Christmas Day (a leg will feed six generously so is ideal for the smaller parties we are facing this year) or for a New Year’s Day feast.   If you are a really small household in lockdown, the leftovers will be delicious – our suckling pig  is just as good cold as it is hot. 
All of the sweet, fruity sauces and accompaniments that we associate with Christmas go beautifully with Middle White Suckling Pig.  We have tried it with Cumberland Sauce, truffled roast potatoes, Middle White chipolatas and devils on horseback – a perfect treat for Christmas Day.
A leg of suckling pig needs about one and a quarter hours in a hot oven.  Dry it very thoroughly, slather with a light olive oil and sprinkle generously with sea salt.  Baste from time to time and keep a watch so that you don’t burn the delicious crackling.
The quantities below for the Cumberland Sauce will be generous for the six or so people you can feed from a leg of Middle White suckling pig. 
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HESTER’S TOMATO RELISH (WITH AT LEAST A NOD TO THE BALLYMALOE COOKERY SCHOOL)
This relish is made in not much more than an hour and is delicious with both Middle White sausages and Longhorn beef burgers (and lots of other things besides!) – and we think adds a special touch you don’t get with a bottled sauce. If you have tomatoes in the garden, some of them a bit misshapen or under- or over-ripe like ours, this is the perfect recipe to use them for.
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ROSAMUND’S MIDDLE WHITE PORK BELLY WITH FENNEL AND LEMON AND HERB RICE

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This is a good recipe for our Middle White belly and it also works well with the small roasting joints from the shoulder, leg and belly which come in our Huntsham Special Box and our Summer Box – they will need an extra 10 minutes cooking time. Middle White pork needs an accompaniment which cuts through the richness of the meat – see my Lemon and Herb Rice recipe. It makes a good summer dish served with a crisp salad. At this time of year, I put one together with Romaine lettuce, wild garlic leaves, plenty of sliced radishes, cucumber and a few pomegranate seeds with a simple French dressing.
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ROSAMUND’S CHERRY SAUCE – FOR SERVING WITH SUCKLING PIG

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The cherry trees in the orchard have been dripping with cherries this year. Even so, we only had a couple of pickings of the sweet ones before the birds (and squirrels – they seem to like cherries too) got the rest. But there were still plenty left of the smaller and slightly tart old-fashioned cherries which made a delicious sauce to go with our Middle White Suckling Pig.
The cherries you find in the shops are sweeter and larger and that is reflected in the recipe. Our suckling pig is as delicious cold as it is hot. Roasted the day before you want to eat it and carved at room temperature, it makes a lovely light dish for a hot day. The first time I made this sauce, the weather was cold and I kept the sauce hot to serve with meat straight from the oven. The second time, we had friends for lunch in the garden and I wanted to serve the pork cold. The sauce was just as good cold.
The only effort is de-stoning the cherries. Even if you can get nice fat cherries rather than my little ones from the tree, I wouldn’t embark on this sauce unless you have one of those gadgets which I think are intended for destoning olives. If you have one of them, getting rid of the stones isn’t too laboursome – and the rest is easy.
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ROSAMUND’S SUCKLING PIG WITH RHUBARB AND GINGER WINE

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This recipe is a delicious way to eat our Middle White suckling pig while rhubarb is still in season. The recipe uses a leg but the shoulder or loin will do just as well – both will need an extra 15 minutes roasting time. It also works very well with joints from our Middle White porkers – with suitable adjustment for the roasting time.
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ROSAMUND’S APPLE SAUCE

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Everyone has their own apple sauce recipe but I think my version goes particularly well with our Middle White, both the porker and the suckling pig. A lot depends on the apples. I like to use Coxes at this time of year but this sauce is even better with some of the lovely old varieties of tart eating apple we have in the orchard, particularly Worcester Pearmain.
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ROSAMUND’S LONGHORN BEEF BURGERS

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One of our packs of Longhorn Mince will make five generous burgers or six smaller ones. They take minutes to make and are in a different league to supermarket burgers.
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ROSAMUND’S BEARNAISE SAUCE
Everyone winter, I usually serve our Longhorn beef with horseradish sauce, made with freshly grated horseradish from the garden. At this time of year, I like to accompany it with a Bearnaise sauce – the tarragon and chervil in it give a lovely taste of summer. You can’t make this sauce without fresh tarragon but you can miss out the chervil at a pinch – though it is so easy to grow from seed and so hard to come by in a supermarket that I always keep a pot outside the kitchen window.
These classic French sauces have a reputation for being a bit of a fiddle. This one really isn’t provided you have an electric whisk. I think it is best served warm but you can make it in advance. However, in my experience the classic way to keep it warm – in a bain marie – is a route to disaster: a degree or two too much heat and the whole thing will dissolve into a curdled mess. A vacuum flask is the answer to your prayers and much more reliable!
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ROSAMUND’S SAUCE GRIBICHE
Our Longhorn beef is so wonderfully succulent, it doesn’t really need a sauce but, if you want a gourmet treat on a summer evening, why not try this easy sauce with barbecued steak. A classic Sauce Gribiche calls for chervil which is difficult to find in a supermarket. It is ridiculously easy to grow – a packet sprinkled on a pot of compost and watered when you remember will be ready to cut in about 3 weeks – but  I think a combination of tarragon, chives and parsley makes a good alternative even if it’s not quite what a grand chef de cuisine might use. Whatever herbs you use, don’t stint on them – it is surprising how much you need to yield the good heaped tablespoonful which the recipe asks for once it has been finely chopped.
Like all recipes which involve making an emulsion, assuming you don’t have strong muscles and all the time in the world, you need to choose the right piece of equipment for the mixing. You can use a hand held electric whisk or the small bowl of a food processor but, if you have a liquidiser with a hole in the lid through which you can dribble the oil, I find that is the best choice. 
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ROSAMUND’S FRENCH ONION SOUP

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We will supply bones of our Longhorn beef free of charge with any order – they make delicious beef stock. Of course this recipe for French Onion soup can be made with tinned consommé – but it will not be nearly as good as this version made with stock made from Longhorn bones. The quantities for the stock can be increased or decreased. If you own a large stock pot, it is worth making more but, either way, it is  really not worth the hassle to make less than the quantity below.
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